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Fecal transplants from cancer patients who respond to checkpoint inhibitor immunotherapy can help boost treatment effect in non-responders.

Precision Oncology Today

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Into the Dark Unknown

The dark genome—it sounds like a work of science fiction. For a dozen or so biotech companies, investigating this mysterious genetic “dark matter” is at least as exciting as anything dreamt up by a movie studio. Once dismissed as “junk DNA,” the dark genome is increasingly looking like an untouched resource that can provide answers to fundamental processes in life.
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Precision Medicine for Obesity: Targeting a Multifactorial Condition

A report published in 2023, estimates that over 40% of adults in the U.S. have obesity, defined as a body mass index (BMI) of...
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New Frontiers in CDx Development

Where is the field of CDx development headed? Today, machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI) are beginning to make an impact on pharma-diagnostic co-development.

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Image of bacteria inside the small intestine to represent the gut microbiome, which can influence the efficacy of immune checkpoint inhibitor immunotherapy.

Fecal Microbiota Transplants Could Boost Cancer Immunotherapy Efficacy

Fecal transplants from cancer patients who respond to checkpoint inhibitor immunotherapy can help boost treatment effect in non-responders.
Heart Failure

New Research Shows Potential for Ketone Therapy in Heart Failure

Preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Basic Cardiovascular Sciences Scientific Sessions 2024 suggests that increasing ketone supply to the heart could significantly enhance energy production in cases of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF).
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Pfizer Gene Therapy for Hemophilia A Nets Positive Results, but Leaves Questions

Pfizer saw positive results of its gene therapy for hemophilia A in a late stage study. The therapy, giroctocogene fitelparvovec, reduced patients’ bleeds for at least 15 months and was generally well tolerated.

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